UK Government Opposes The Use Of The Phrase “Pregnant Women”

The statement to the UN comes as an official submission on potential amendments to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

UK Government, Pregnant Women, Pregnant People, Inclusive, United Nations, ‘A Guide to Effective Communication: Inclusive Language in the Workplace
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In an attempt to be more inclusive, the UK government has called for pregnancy terms to be made gender-neutral at the United Nations. The call suggests that the term “pregnant woman” should not be used in order to be more inclusive of trans people, who have given birth.

The move comes just days after the British Prime Minister Theresa May spoke at the PinkNews Awards, vowing to “streamline” the gender recognition process to make it easier for trans people to transition.

Doctors are being told not to call pregnant women ‘mothers’ - over fears they might offend transgender people.

"We requested that the UN human rights committee made it clear that the same right [to life for pregnant women] extends to pregnant transgender people," a Foreign and Commonwealth Office statement said.

The British Medical Association (BMA) - the trade union and professional body for doctors in the UK - has issued the advice in official guidelines issued to its 160,000 members who work in hospitals and general practice across the UK.

The advice came in a 14-page leaflet, called ‘A Guide to Effective Communication: Inclusive Language in the Workplace.’

The guideline also suggests that "The elderly" should be referred to as "older people", "disabled lifts" called "accessible lifts" and someone who is "biologically male or female" should be called "assigned male or female".

The BMA clarified that the document was purely guidance for its staff on effective communication within the workplace, not advice to its 160,000 doctor members on how to deal with patients.

The statement to the UN comes as an official submission on potential amendments to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

The statement, however, has offended a feminist writer, who thinks that this move is anti-feminist.

"This isn't inclusion. This is making women unmentionable. Having a female body and knowing what that means for reproduction doesn't make you 'exclusionary'. Forcing us to decorously scrub out any reference to our sex on pain of being called bigots is an insult," said Sarah Ditum.

Last week, the British Prime Minister had announced that her government plans to go ahead with a consultation on changes to the country's Gender Recognition Act, allowing people to "self-certify" their gender.

Critics have also said that biological men will get the legal right to access women's hospital wards, prisons, lavatories, changing rooms and competitive sports simply by declaring they are female.

Information source: pinknews

Cover image source: bbc


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Manali Kulkarni (WRITER)

Manali Kulkarni writes for Reacho. If you wish to get in touch with them, drop in a mail at reach@reacho.in

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